free patterns


In pursuit of a wrap to wear for our son’s wedding in late August, I’m knitting the Holden Shawlette by Mindy Wilkes. It’s a free pattern download on Ravelry. I wanted a lace shawl pattern that was an easy project, as I am pushed for time as usual. But I also needed it to be fairly dressy. There are two free shawl patterns, using only one skein of sock yarn, in this posting, one that begins at the bottom and the lace one that is cast on from the center neck. Both are easy shawl patterns for beginner first time shawl knitting…great accessories to wear as shawlettes, cowls, or a triangle scarf. You’ll find even more free shawl patterns and Princess Kate’s shawl at knitnscribble.com, link below.

The Holden Shawlette, cast on from the center neck, has several inches of stockinette stitch in the beginning rows divided by yarn overs on the edge and in the center. The pattern is so easy to remember, you don’t need markers, as your knitting does the marking for you. I don’t enjoy using markers anyway, but sometimes you just have to. This photo is a little lop-sided, because the circular needle’s gone all wonky, should have run it under hot water to straighten it out before I started casting on.

Then the pattern changes to the lace pattern. This one is Mindy’s. She used one skein of Malabrigo sock yarn, a lovely yarn, hand-dyed with tonal color qualities.

I’m using another Merino wool and silk hand-dyed sock yarn. I’m a little disappointed in the color, as it was called ‘silver’, but it’s actually the color of ‘squirrel’. Lesson learned here is to go to your loyal yarn shop if you are wanting a special colorway of yarn, so you can see it up close and personal. May or may not use this shawl for the wedding, jury is still out. It’s a lovely yarn, no doubt, just not the colorway I wanted for this project.

You begin by casting on 3 stitches, using a long-tail method, with a US 6 (4.25mm) needle at the top center of the back, then picking up three stitches on the bumps of those and then three more, sounds confusing, but it isn’t really.


The number of stitches are then gradually increased to equal 193 via yarn overs, 4 on every right side row, two yarn overs in the center, and one on each side.

It’s actually much easier than casting on and counting 270 or so stitches as for the Abyssal shawl, which I have made several times in an Old Shale pattern, also mistakenly called ‘feather and fan’.

The Abyssal is a fun free shawl pattern to knit, available written in French or English, too, but it begins from the bottom up and requires the tedious counting to start. The pattern is also a free download on Ravelry. Here’s one I made for a birthday present for one of our daughters. Just like the Holden Shawlette, Abyssal can be worn as a shawl or a scarf, very versatile accessory.

In any case, the Holden Shawl continues every evening, and I will shortly have reached the lace portion of the pattern.

The depth from the center down is about 9 inches now. The finished width will be approximately 55 in by 25.5 inches long from the center down, depending on how it is blocked. Wish me luck! (to be continued…) For even more free patterns, even Princess Kate’s shawl pattern, her famous shopping ruffle shawl, visit knitnscribble.com, where you can enter any keyword to search for free knitting and crochet patterns. Language translation available as well on knitnscribble.com.

I’ve always been a sucker for bonnets and when I saw Larissa Brown’s new bonnet eBook, Love Bonnet, I wanted to knit them all. Problem is, I don’t have many infants to knit for these days, and needed a larger size.

So, I have created a larger bonnet pattern, based on Larissa’s “Juniper Bonnet”, which is a free pattern.  Hoping that the bonnet for older kids and toddlers in bigger sizes will be the new trend, so I can knit some more….. a natural transition from the earflap hat and sock monkey hat fads this past fall and winter.

Call me “crazy,” but the bonnet is so practical…great hat to wear with ponytails. In the Nordic countries, all ages wear ski bonnets…just because it’s called a bonnet, doesn’t mean it’s for babies.

This one is trimmed in a little dove gray cotton and knit with about one skein of soft grape wool and alpaca for Easter, which is rarely a warm time in New England. The bonnet doesn’t have to be tied, but the ties can hang down, like the older children usually prefer to wear them.

There are five repeats of the feather and fan in this larger bonnet pattern. The finished size of this one is about 17 inches around and will fit up to a six year old.

If you are interested in this larger size feather and fan bonnet for toddlers, kids, and older heads, please subscribe to this blog and let me know by leaving a comment. I also plan to write a larger bonnet pattern for a plain stripe design.

For Larissa’s Juniper Bonnet pattern, written for infants, click here.

Have decided to knit a few more large hobo handbags for felting. They are really fun to do, and the results are always a surprise. Getting more than one ready for felting at the same time, saves hot water when it’s time to felt. I’ve finished the knitting and crocheting for the first one . It’s called: “The chicken or the egg?”…It’s a favorite saying of a certain pragmatist I know, and I found all the theme ingredients for this recipe in my fabric and yarn stash. Follow this blog for a free pattern for a felted tote bag.

chicken or the egg felted hobo bag

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Have just included a schematic for stitches for the 3 button shawl, and wanted to include the free knitting pattern here. It’s a similar one to a very popular 3 button shawl as featured on the Today Show with Hoda and Kathy Lee long ago.

aishlings-shawl1-e1531684709561.jpg

A very easy knitting pattern, great for beginning knitters,  just a rectangle you can add your own creativity to. Very versatile in the different looks you can get by buttoning the shawl differently, and a most practical knitting project for spring and fall.
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As a beginner sock knitter, just this summer, these strawberry socks were a breeze, using a free easy sock pattern I wanted to share with you. If you are wondering what knitting socks is like, how to turn the heel, graft the toe, and afraid to try, don’t be. This is a great beginner sock pattern that still has enough stitch definition, really doesn’t look like a first attempt at knitting socks, does it? Well, it’s the pattern, not the knitter, for sure.

Socks are a wonderful knitting technique, easy to learn, mesmerizing and addicting needlework…. (more…)

Thought I would update the blog to include several free baby and toddler knitting and crochet patterns that I have recently written about on Examiner.com and InfoBarrel.com as Sharon Watterson, Knitting in Providence. Rarely do I write about anything other than free patterns, so please subscribe, if you haven’t already. Rose bonnet pattern for little girls and Monster face pants or longies for girls and boys. InfoBarrel subjects are varied, but there are many knitting and crochet patterns there, too. (more…)

Just finished this circular vest. It’s an easy, free knitting pattern once offered by Elann.com you can knit with no problem and it’s fun to do. The free pattern is available here for personal use only. (more…)

Stay on baby booties

These baby booty patterns are great, because they stay on baby’s little feet. This was a much visited article I wrote a while ago, plus a special heirloom pattern and another new crocheted one, just wanted to make it available to you again. Knit and crochet Baby booties free patterns…

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These are just the cutest strawberry baby booties, with little crocheted flowers and will be the hit of any baby shower. They will fit a baby 0-3 months and can be knitted in cotton or a wool blend, when the gauge of the yarn is the same. This free knitting pattern is an original by Hrönn Jónsdóttir, Knit Strawberry Baby Booties. (more…)

We’ve always been big watermelon fans…partly because watermelons are so refreshingly tasty in the summertime, and often, a nickname for our Watterson family.

I do remember sitting on my grandmother’s back steps with the rest of my cousins in the summer time, eating watermelon and spitting the seeds in the garden. Granny always “toted one home”, as she called it, on Fridays, after sewing upholstery in the furniture factory. It’s a wonder there wasn’t a watermelon farm growing in Granny’s backyard. Simple pleasures and great memories.

Baby watermelons

Recently, with a new baby in our North Carolina family, I have knit two new watermelon hats, different from the one I made ten years ago for Baby Charlotte, our first grandchild. Free baby watermelons here, a hat pattern (more…)

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