Katerina Bobkova’s new shawl pattern is proving very popular this spring. The free pattern requires only three colorways of yarn, or you can knit it in a solid color. This shawl pattern is perfect for beginners or veteran knitting alike.

magic spring shawl patternThe hardest part in planning a multi-colored shawl is choosing pleasing yarn colorways. I was able to find five skeins of Manos del Uruguay “Serena” on Etsy at a savings of $30, so I’m using the “bosenberry” colorway and two other yarns from my stash for the Magic Spring Shawl. For more information about shawl knitting and even more interesting free patterns, please click here.

K.Bobkova photo.

copyright Sharon Watterson

I was about to put my sweater on this morning, the “Levenwick” cardigan knitting pattern, a top-down raglan design by Gudrun Johnston, mentioned way back in September, when I remembered that I hadn’t written about its finish. Christmas came in between Levenwick and a whole bunch of other knitting, so it was side-tracked for quite a while, but finally finished in early February, and I wear it all the time. (Here, it looks a little lop-sided, March’s wind is blowing this morning.)  Read on…. (more…)

It’s a new year, and for me, it has meant, thankfully, new followers here on WordPress, many thank you’s. Also, I’m  returning to some enjoyable knitting projects of long ago when knitting for our children as teenagers and young adults and just finished this Fair Isle pullover or jumper. It’s a free pattern and was the sweater Scarlett Johansson wore in the film, “We Bought a Zoo” with Matt Damon.

fair isle 007

Sharon Watterson

Fair Isle design gets a once every 20-year push and is all the craze again this year as it was in the 60’s and 80’s.  (more…)

In pursuit of a wrap to wear for our son’s wedding in late August, I’m knitting the Holden Shawlette by Mindy Wilkes. It’s a free pattern download on Ravelry. I wanted a lace shawl pattern that was an easy project, as I am pushed for time as usual. But I also needed it to be fairly dressy. There are two free shawl patterns, using only one skein of sock yarn, in this posting, one that begins at the bottom and the lace one that is cast on from the center neck. Both are easy shawl patterns for beginner first time shawl knitting…great accessories to wear as shawlettes, cowls, or a triangle scarf. You’ll find even more free shawl patterns and Princess Kate’s shawl at knitnscribble.com, link below.

The Holden Shawlette, cast on from the center neck, has several inches of stockinette stitch in the beginning rows divided by yarn overs on the edge and in the center. The pattern is so easy to remember, you don’t need markers, as your knitting does the marking for you. I don’t enjoy using markers anyway, but sometimes you just have to. This photo is a little lop-sided, because the circular needle’s gone all wonky, should have run it under hot water to straighten it out before I started casting on.

Then the pattern changes to the lace pattern. This one is Mindy’s. She used one skein of Malabrigo sock yarn, a lovely yarn, hand-dyed with tonal color qualities.

I’m using another Merino wool and silk hand-dyed sock yarn. I’m a little disappointed in the color, as it was called ‘silver’, but it’s actually the color of ‘squirrel’. Lesson learned here is to go to your loyal yarn shop if you are wanting a special colorway of yarn, so you can see it up close and personal. May or may not use this shawl for the wedding, jury is still out. It’s a lovely yarn, no doubt, just not the colorway I wanted for this project.

You begin by casting on 3 stitches, using a long-tail method, with a US 6 (4.25mm) needle at the top center of the back, then picking up three stitches on the bumps of those and then three more, sounds confusing, but it isn’t really.


The number of stitches are then gradually increased to equal 193 via yarn overs, 4 on every right side row, two yarn overs in the center, and one on each side.

It’s actually much easier than casting on and counting 270 or so stitches as for the Abyssal shawl, which I have made several times in an Old Shale pattern, also mistakenly called ‘feather and fan’.

The Abyssal is a fun free shawl pattern to knit, available written in French or English, too, but it begins from the bottom up and requires the tedious counting to start. The pattern is also a free download on Ravelry. Here’s one I made for a birthday present for one of our daughters. Just like the Holden Shawlette, Abyssal can be worn as a shawl or a scarf, very versatile accessory.

In any case, the Holden Shawl continues every evening, and I will shortly have reached the lace portion of the pattern.

The depth from the center down is about 9 inches now. The finished width will be approximately 55 in by 25.5 inches long from the center down, depending on how it is blocked. Wish me luck! (to be continued…) For even more free patterns, even Princess Kate’s shawl pattern, her famous shopping ruffle shawl, visit knitnscribble.com, where you can enter any keyword to search for free knitting and crochet patterns. Language translation available as well on knitnscribble.com.

I’ve always been a sucker for bonnets and when I saw Larissa Brown’s new bonnet eBook, Love Bonnet, I wanted to knit them all. Problem is, I don’t have many infants to knit for these days, and needed a larger size.

So, I have created a larger bonnet pattern, based on Larissa’s “Juniper Bonnet”, which is a free pattern.  Hoping that the bonnet for older kids and toddlers in bigger sizes will be the new trend, so I can knit some more….. a natural transition from the earflap hat and sock monkey hat fads this past fall and winter.

Call me “crazy,” but the bonnet is so practical…great hat to wear with ponytails. In the Nordic countries, all ages wear ski bonnets…just because it’s called a bonnet, doesn’t mean it’s for babies.

This one is trimmed in a little dove gray cotton and knit with about one skein of soft grape wool and alpaca for Easter, which is rarely a warm time in New England. The bonnet doesn’t have to be tied, but the ties can hang down, like the older children usually prefer to wear them.

There are five repeats of the feather and fan in this larger bonnet pattern. The finished size of this one is about 17 inches around and will fit up to a six year old.

If you are interested in this larger size feather and fan bonnet for toddlers, kids, and older heads, please subscribe to this blog and let me know by leaving a comment. I also plan to write a larger bonnet pattern for a plain stripe design.

For Larissa’s Juniper Bonnet pattern, written for infants, click here.

Have decided to knit a few more large hobo handbags for felting. They are really fun to do, and the results are always a surprise. Getting more than one ready for felting at the same time, saves hot water when it’s time to felt. I’ve finished the knitting and crocheting for the first one . It’s called: “The chicken or the egg?”…It’s a favorite saying of a certain pragmatist I know, and I found all the theme ingredients for this recipe in my fabric and yarn stash. Follow this blog for a free pattern for a felted tote bag.

chicken or the egg felted hobo bag

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A knitting pattern for a warm earflap balaclava hat with a monkey face and ears—

Sock monkey stuffed animal toys have been around since Victorian times, believe it or not. Victoriana became enraptured by monkeys and their exotic world in the 1890’s. When the Rockland, Illinois wool work sock factory started making socks with red heels, that’s how the arts and crafts creation got his red mouth and behind.

Rockland still celebrates a “Sock Monkey Festival” in the 21st century.

Last winter when my granddaughter’s middle school friends latched onto the sock monkey hat craze,  I designed this sock monkey hat knitting pattern with earflaps for Charlotte, who is  eleven years old. The pattern has now been knitted for adults, teens, and children alike.

Cheeky sock monkey hat pattern (more…)